New Hedonism

As we live through the self care boom and a time of peak wellness, where does pleasure-seeking fit in? Download the full report on New Hedonism for how we’re letting our hair down in 2019 and beyond...

New Hedonism – download it here.

When you think of hedonism, you most likely imagine sex, drugs and rock’n’roll. But in a world where meditation apps are the new way to escape the daily humdrum, and bars are stocking drinks sans alcohol, it’s time to think about what fun, partying and indulgence mean in a more socially-conscious society. 

Earlier in the heady heat of summer (and early in the not so heady morning) associate director Berny McManus and director Dunstan Kornicki redefined hedonism for our Rise breakfast attendees. They took us on a whistle stop tour of hedonism’s evolution from illegal raves in warehouses, to the kind that feature yoga mats and smoothies. 

Does this shift mean we’re witnessing the arrival of the most sensible generation yet? Well, the ways we get our kicks are still driven by the same four elements of pleasure-seeking: sense, ideals, social interaction and intellectual engagement, but the narrow Western definition of hedonism is being left behind as we see a more global, inclusive version open up that no longer hinges on pure excess. This change in how we express our pursuit of pleasure is a direct reflection of the cultural landscape altering around us. 

As this generation operates with a newfound sense of restraint, they’re also rejecting the rulebook  – on sexuality, sensorial quirks and partying with a more conscious mindset. So, it’s not quite time to forget sex, drugs and rock’n’roll altogether, it just might be time to look at them a little bit differently.

Our New Hedonism report dives into those elemental needs for pleasure and a range of cultural examples to take you through thrill-seeking’s change in identity – download it here.