Is America ready to make fun of itself? Crowd DNA New York’s Eden Lauffer explores how this year’s Super Bowl ads are poking fun amid the turmoil...

With the Trump presidency in the US and Brexit anxiety in the UK, both locales are no stranger to turmoil. But as fires spread in Australia and China’s coronavirus lockdown continues, 2020 seems to have kicked off with a feeling of worldwide unrest. In the first few weeks of January alone, online memes have been crying World War III and the end of humanity as we know it (with a humorous twist, of course). It’s no surprise, then, that escapism has become a fully-fledged trend since the 2016 US election. Consumers retreat from the noise of politics into rent-a-nap centers, drag culture, astrology charts etc. 

Escapism takes a new form in this year’s Super Bowl ads. After all we’ve been through in just the first month of 2020 – the Harvey Weinstein trial, the impeachment case, the overwhelming number of presidential candidates – America is ready to start making fun of itself. And while funny, over the top ads are synonymous with the Super Bowl, this year, their tone is a different kind of escapist humor – it’s more tongue in cheek.  

Of those ads, we’ve identified three cultural trends that they fall into, namely: mocking millennials, poking fun at devices that listen to us, and lightly treading on political satire. 

Avocados From Mexico pokes fun at the millennial love of avocados.
Avocados From Mexico pokes fun at the millennial love of avocados.

Mocking Millennials, Again

If you’re a millennial (as I am), you may find millennial jokes tiring by now. But in this year’s ads, the media seems to be on our side with several brands playing on some of the typical ways people like to mock this generation. For example, millennials are often criticized for spending on unnecessary items such as avocados. In response, Avocados From Mexico stages a shopping network featuring absurd products for your avocado to use, such as a pool floaty or a bike helmet.

Another popular millennial jab revolves around a lax work ethic. In a similar vein, we see Cheetos and MC Hammer join forces to help one millennial escape his responsibilities using the excuse of ‘Cheeto fingers’. As millennials now make up a prominent percentage of our population, these blows nod to a somewhat thicker-skinned America.

Pringles jest about robot mind control forcing us to buy products.
Pringles jest about robot mind control forcing us to buy products.

Ears Everywhere

The idea that our devices are constantly listening is not a new one. As we continue to rely on technology and give up personal information, privacy becomes a more glaring concern. Even with this anxiety we continue using apps that may be leveraging our faces to strengthen facial recognition. A number of this year’s Super Bowl ads poke fun at our comfort with privacy invading devices. In Pringles’ and Bud Light Seltzer’s ads, Morty (of Rick & Morty) and Post Malone fall captive to mind control, respectively.

The commentary in the Pringles ad presents an extreme scenario of brands consuming our minds, encouraging us to buy new products. In the Bug Light spot, Post Malone’s brain is manned by a control center dictating which actions he should make when purchasing a drink. We complain about devices taking over, but still feed the problem. So at this point, perhaps it is best to just laugh at the continuing spiral of how much we rely on them.

Snickers asks the big questions. Is a world where moms send nudes one we want to live in?
Snickers asks the big questions. Is a world where moms send nudes one we want to live in?

Tip-Toeing On Political 

In post-2016 election Super Bowls, some brands took a political stance, alluding to their position on the Trump Administration actions like building a wall. However, this year’s ads transcend any political stance by instead mocking the general political climate in the US, including how non-Americans perceive the country’s unrest. In a jovial song, Americans band together to #FixtheWorld by feeding it a giant Snickers. The ad features babies named Kale, moms sending nudes, and influencers falling into an enormous hole. Budweiser approaches this same satire in a more subtle way, playing on negative American stereotypes. The narrative dismisses a ‘typical American’ for being loud, while the ad shows a group of protestors speaking out on a cause. While the 2016 election showed an America more divided than expected, there’s still common ground between us. The ability to laugh about the ridiculousness of things like babies named Kale bands together people on both sides.  

In early 2017, many Americans wanted nothing more than to escape the turbulence of the United States. Advertising shied away from our new president and everything that came along with him. It helped us forget our troubles by transporting us to simpler times. Think, for example, of the silly humor of Bud Light’s ‘Dilly Dilly’ campaign. Today, as we’re in the depths of a trial aimed at impeaching the president, it feels as if the pressure has reached boiling point. These ads prove that we’re beginning to laugh at ourselves again; and as we prepare for another presidential term, this satirical American voice helps cut the tension.