Catch Crowd DNA’s London managing director Dr Matilda Andersson and senior consultant Roberta Graham discussing how leading edge behaviour can predict what’s next for mainstream consumers...

MRS hosts Methodology In Context on November 22 in London  – a chance for insight professionals to explore new, creative and dynamic methodologies and how best to apply them within research. We’re excited to announce that Crowd DNA’s Matilda Andersson and Roberta Graham will be presenting Leading The Pack: a session focussing on how leading edge behaviour can predict what’s next for mainstream consumers, and the methods and tools we use to do so.

Predicting the future is at the top of any insight and innovation wish list. All too often, however, brands fail to spot what’s coming next by sticking too close to their already existing consumers. Using leading edge participants as predictors of mainstream behaviour is obviously nothing new, but doing so accurately – and in a way that’s relevant for specific categories or brands – remains one of the greatest enigmas within our industry.

With that in mind they’ll ask: what tools and frameworks do we need to turn this art into science? And is observing ‘leading-edgers’ the future of brand health and cultural relevancy?

For those keen to learn more about how we use leading edge behaviour to keep an eye on the future, you can find out more info here.

As legislation relaxes, perceptions of marijuana are changing. Crowd DNA’s Eden Lauffer explores how women are leading the cannabis rebrand...

We all know the pothead stereotype: it’s the Dazed And Confused crew or films of Seth Rogen. However, with cannabis now legal in Canada and nine US states, that image is shifting. In fact, a recent poll found that 61 per cent of Americans feel cannabis should be legalized, a number that’s grown 49 per cent since 1969. So what does the future of cannabis look like and who’s driving the rebrand?

Female celebrities push for normalcy

A recent survey found that 56 per cent of Americans find that ‘smoking weed is socially acceptable’. In efforts to push this further, some celebrities have stepped up. However, widespread acceptance won’t come from brands led by the likes of Snoop Dogg and Willie Nelson; celebrities who don’t fit the stoner stereotype also need to get involved. Coming out with Whoopi & Maya and advocating for cannabis relief during menstrual cramps, Whoopi Goldberg has helped bring normalcy to the market and destigmatize usage. Similarly, Melissa Etheridge is working on Etheridge Farms in hopes of offering products such as arthritis balm to a wider audience.

Women and moms enter the market

It’s not just celebrities starting brands. Take Miss Grass, a shop and blog for women, which has a cannabis focus but also provides typical women’s magazine topics, like fitness tips. In an interview with W, Miss Grass co-creator, Anna Duckworth, spoke of their mission to dissolve the stoner stereotype, which lacks a female narrative. Duckworth’s counterpart, Kate Miller told W, “There’s a lot of ways of using cannabis, and many don’t even get you high,” in reference to their products like CBD lube and lotion. Women report using cannabis for menopause and menstruation, but also to relax and enhance sex.

According to a BDS Analytics study, of the 49 per cent of women who use cannabis as medicine, 54 per cent report they are mothers with children under 18 in the home. Publications like Splimm and The Cannavist Mom stand with moms, serving as a newsletter for parents who indulge in cannabis, offering articles as well as a safe space. Mom-friendly products have landed in the market too. Mother & Clone, a CBD spray that lasts only 60 seconds, was created by a mother dealing with postpartum depression. Similarly, TONIC was started by a female personal trainer who struggled with anxiety and found benefits in CBD (as it lacks THC, the psychoactive ingredients of cannabis).

Beyond female friendly products and publications, women are taking the business side of cannabis by storm, too. Already recognizing the buying power and influence women have had, organizations like Women Grow, the largest network of cannabis professionals, are empowering female leaders to strive in the cannabis market in hopes of starting more women-led companies.

This is clearly a space to watch. According to Forbes, by 2021 the cannabis industry is set to grow 150 per cent. That, paired with the 70 to 80 per cent spending power women hold in the US, means that female cannabis users are a group to focus on. As legalization sweeps the US and cannabis continues to enter the beauty and wellness space, brands preparing to tap into the market shouldn’t neglect the huge share of voice women hold.

A new chapter and a new city for Crowd DNA...

Following our launch in New York last summer, we’re now equally excited to be touching down in Singapore. Emma Gage, former managing director of Flamingo in Singapore, is heading up our business here and we’re raring to go.

The Singapore launch is designed to both service Crowd DNA’s existing clients in the region, and develop new business opportunities, with an emphasis on helping decode how people and the world are changing.

Andy Crysell, Crowd DNA group managing director and founder, says: “We’re excited to now be launching in Singapore and cannot think of a better person to lead our business in the APAC region than Emma. She can call on significant experience in our core field of offering authentically culture-fueled strategic recommendation that enables brands to adapt and improve.”

Emma Gage, who’s lived and worked in Singapore and Shanghai for nine years, says: “Crowd’s ‘culture-first’ approach is an obvious fit for the region, combined with an innovative set of approaches and a hugely talented and creative team.  I can’t wait to get started.”

To discuss Crowd DNA in Singapore further, please contact Emma Gage or Andy Crysell

Our Rise breakfast events return to London this autumn. Next up, Crowd DNA’s Roberta Graham and Laura Boerboom offer a guide to semiotics and how we use it to ignite our culturally-charged superpowers...

Date: September 20

Time: 8.15am-9am

Location: Crowd DNA, 5 Lux Building, 2-4 Hoxton Square, London, N1 6NU

There’s important meaning to be found in all aspects of culture. But what about in the smaller interactions and behaviours – or the actual words, textures and sounds – that shape our world? Significant meaning, it turns out, often gets overlooked within the layers.

Our new set of consultative services – Futures, Semiotics & Listening – helps ensure that nothing of cultural significance is missed. Each approach kits us out with different ways to decode culture and unlock the meaning inside, well, everything.

But what exactly is semiotics? And how does it connect back to real business challenges?

In our next Rise event, we’ll demystify the methodology, before exploring how we use it to identify white spaces, pinpoint cultural futures and prepare brands for new markets. We’ll talk through how we’ve deployed semiotics to execute fresh positionings; help update packaging and products; inspire and provide toolkits for creative strategies; and, ultimately, how we use it to reach new levels of culturally-charged advantage for our clients.  

If you’d like to ‘decode’ semiotics, please join us for coffee, croissants and a guide to this exciting methodology. Contact Pauline Rault to come along – and feel free to pass this invite on to colleagues too.

Watch the trailer below:

Busy times at Crowd DNA - meaning we’re also getting busy on the recruitment front, with these roles to fill in our lovely Hoxton Square office in London...

We openings across specialisms such as strategic insight, quantitative research, project management, creative delivery and social listening.  Here’s an overview of each role.


Associate Director – strategic insights (circa £52,000-£57,000)

We’re seeking a skilled and strategically-minded insight specialist to design and lead projects across categories such as alcohol, retail, fashion, FMCG and media. You’ll need to show proof of experience at all points from proposal writing, to managing the complexities of global work and providing impactful outputs that drive change. Reporting in to our strategic insights directors, you will have line management responsibilities and the license to develop new ideas and lead some of our most exciting commissions.

Senior Consultant – quant & analytics (circa £38,000-42,000)

We’re looking for a confident addition to our quant and analytics team to get hands on with leading projects from start to finish. You’ll need to demonstrate a flair for creative project design, experience in multi-market studies, and a passion for integrating quant and qual work. Solid segmentation experience and a track record of using advanced analytics such as max diff and conjoint is a plus. Reporting in to our quant and analytics director, besides leading projects, you’ll have the opportunity to sharpen your commercial skills, preparing proposals and working on business development.

Consultant – strategic insights, German language capabilities (circa £30,000-£32,000

An opportunity to join our strategic insights team, collaborating on cultural understanding briefs for clients across multiple categories. We’re looking for someone with circa two years experience (most likely in a similar agency environment), good exposure to clients and, in this instance, who comes with high level German language capabilities.

Exec/Consultant – strategic insights, with social listening skills (£23,000-£32,000)

You will get to work across strategic insights projects in a host of ways – desk research, trends analysis, workshops – but you’ll come armed with particular skills in using social media platforms – Brandwatch preferred, with an aptitude for using it to get to both data-led stories and as means to visual analysis. You will therefore get to develop the ‘Crowd DNA way’ of using social listening, with cultural sensibilities to the fore.

Project Producer – project management skills (£23,000-£32,000)

Demonstrable project management skills are vital here, as you’ll play a pivotal role in designing and running projects, with touchpoints including liaising with clients, suppliers and, of course, Crowd DNA’s in-house team. You don’t necessarily need experience in insight and strategy environments – more a track record in ensuring projects run smoothly; managing timelines, sourcing costs, allocating resource etc. Any form of recruitment (experts, artists, influencers) or casting experience is a plus.

Exec – Socialise creative team (circa £23,000)

We’re looking for someone who definitely comes with good film experience (bonus points if you’re au fait with Canon film kit and Adobe Creative Suite), but who’s also keen to extend themselves across different creative areas – photography, trends analysis, designing mixed media outputs and generally working in an environment where enabling brands to get to grips with cultural change is key.


All roles come with great benefits (betterment scheme, training, sabbatical, company lunches and days out, flexi hours etc); the chance to work on some of the most stimulating and culturally-driven projects out there; and the opportunity to progress in an exciting and progressive business. To find out more info about a particular role, or to apply (attaching a CV and covering letter), please get in touch with Dr Matilda Andersson.

Interning @ Crowd DNA

We spoke to three of our intern-turned-employees about their journeys at Crowd DNA, and what they got from an initial placement with us...

Internships at Crowd DNA have nothing to do with making tea. We offer hands-on placements to people at all stages in their careers; giving aspiring researchers, creatives and strategists a chance to learn more about cultural insight work. From day one, our interns get to input on real projects for amazing brands. These internships often lead to permanent roles – with that in mind, here’s what three of our former interns had to say about their journeys at Crowd.

Robert Downer, exec (strategic insights)

I discovered Crowd when I was studying for my master’s. I wanted a career change after working in education management and I thought that insight would be ideal for me. I like meeting new people, exploring ideas and being creative. But to get into a new industry, I knew I would need experience (both for my CV and for myself), so I thought an internship was a good way to go.

On my first day at the Hoxton Square office, everyone was friendly, open and super smart. I got stuck in and started working with some huge brands from the get go. In my first month, I worked on an online community, conducted interviews and even went on fieldwork. I was completely trusted, and that’s what I liked about the internship: I wasn’t treated like an intern at all. I was part of the team.

Now that I’m an exec, I take a lead role on projects for major clients, receive regular training and feel supported in all areas of my progression. Interning at Crowd was a great choice for me at a crucial turning point in my career.

Salem Khalazi, exec (Socialise creative team)

I became an intern in quite an unusual way: as a project participant. I was hanging out in Hoxton Square when two of the Crowd team walked towards me with a video camera. They were collecting voxpops and wanted my thoughts on the future of music television.

I didn’t know much about cultural insights at the time – only that I wanted to develop my skills as a designer in a professional setting. So, after my brief stint as a voxpopper, I sent my portfolio to the team and dived into a seemingly random opportunity. It was this curiosity and can-do attitude that shaped my first month as an intern. I threw myself into creative projects, big and small, and was trusted to design infographics about Canadian millennials for a key client. Eventually, I was offered a job in the Socialise team helping to bring insights to life via creative delivery.

Crowd DNA now plays a huge part in shaping a future where I’d like to build visual experiences that explore our ever-changing culture. Crowd’s blend of strategic insights and game-changing creativity is the perfect place to hone my skills.

Marjory Drevet, exec (strategic insights)  

Studying people and culture has always been a personal interest, especially during my recent travels across America and Europe. I thought that a cultural insights agency would be a great place for me to turn this knowledge into a profession, so I got in touch with Crowd DNA.

Originally from France, I was put straight to work on a project about Parisian youth culture. It was really illuminating and I was surprised how my generation represented a relevant behavioural shift for brands. The project allowed me to view my background from a different perspective and assess what opportunities there were for brands. 

After six weeks of intense learning and involvement, the internship confirmed my interest in connecting brands to people, and explaining people to brands. My ultimate goal is to inspire companies with culture, and being at Crowd DNA finally allows me to settle down and build on this expertise. I couldn’t be more ‘Crowd Proud’ that I’m now officially part of the team.

We regularly post internship openings on our blog, so keep an eye out here – or get in touch if you’d like to find out more: hello@crowdDNA.com

We’re seeking one to join our strategic insights team in Hoxton Square, London...

Cultural insights and strategy consultancy Crowd DNA is seeking a consummately skilled strategic insights expert to join our London team as an associate director. You’ll get to work on fabulously diverse and exciting projects for some of the biggest names around. The briefs we get are amazing – truly at the intersection of culture and brands. We want someone who can bring both provocative thinking and total diligence to this type of work, and who can call on circa six plus years of relevant experience.

Here, in more detail, is what we’re looking for:

- You need to have the confidence and necessary experience to take the controls of large and sometimes complex projects; to be an informed, energised and trusted advisor to our clients

- We’re looking for strong evidence of experience in areas such as brand positioning, proposition development, growth strategies, trends exploration and innovation/transformation projects

- You’ll bring with you skills such as desk and qual research, interacting with experts and influencers, developing frameworks and personas, and using diverse data sources (for instance, social media listening)

- Demonstrating experience of working on multi-market projects is important; as is the ability to lead a team

- Also of working on high quality proposals and project design – plus a demonstrable interest in devising strategies for bringing new clients on board and bolstering existing client relationships

- We’re looking for someone who can bring a real sense of craft to their work – from the outputs they produce and strategic recommendations they devise, to how they run workshops and articulate fresh ideas that have cultural-commercial relevance

- We want someone who’s enthusiastic about the idea of working alongside strategists, writers, film-makers and designers; collaborating both with those in our London team and in our overseas offices

The role comes with a competitive salary and benefits, plus clear paths to promotion and to new opportunities.  It’s an entrepreneurial and energised environment, fast paced and collaborative. If you fancy working in a place where setting the agenda for the future of cultural insights and strategy is coded into the way of working, please do get in touch, providing a covering letter and CV in the first instance.

Let’s Dance

Brands such as Nike, H&M and Apple are tapping into interpretive dance styles to reflect joy in the moment rather than striving for goals. Crowd DNA semiotics expert Roberta Graham explores...

Interpretive dance is nothing new. But what was once seen as an elitist art form and joked about in popular culture is now strongly resonating with people and brands. Sure, we all like to dance, but we’re talking about more than a drunken flail on a Saturday night. Recent portrayals of dance feel much more empowering, liberating and revolutionary than ever before.

The influence of artists and choreographers such as New Noveta, Holly Blakey and Wayne McGregor have been widely reflected in the mainstream. Over recent years a number of high-profile and successful campaigns have leveraged this trend to create engaging and energised communications. But why is everyone suddenly dancing? What’s driving our interest and connection to dance?

Transformation through dance

Spike Jonze’s creation of Kenzo World shows a young woman on the brink of tears escaping a desperately boring ceremony. Stumbling into the deserted halls of a hotel, she springs into an instinctual and joyfully disruptive dance – as if against her own will. The feeling of release is tangible as this lone woman in a ball gown breaks free and becomes her true self, crushing stereotypes of demure femininity with her powerful gestures. More recently, Apple’s Homepod advert shares a similar theme. An almost unrecognisably drab FKA Twigs dances off the drudgery of city life in the solitude of her apartment.

Not only does dance draw these examples together, they also share context. Visibly exhausted faces make way for performative expressions. Dance takes on a transformative role, for both the character and the space around them as they escape and transform  – and, ultimately, offer the audience the opportunity to do the same.

Mindful movement

Culture is shifting away from a goal-oriented mindset towards self-fulfilment and joy in the moment. For example, the popularity of dance classes as a form of exercise offer people physical release without the pressure to lose weight or beat a pb. In a culture of mindfulness, dance meets our emotional and physical needs as an active meditation. Lotte Anderson’s installation ‘Dance Therapy’ explores this therapeutic quality of movement. Similarly, influencers such as Naomi Shimada – who has collaborated with ASOS and Nike on the subject –  also advocate dance in line with self-care. Shimada incidentally stars in H&M’s spring 2018 campaign, a diverse feminist tango, choreographed by Holly Blakey.

Breaking free

The women mentioned in these examples all show a refreshing carelessness and confidence. Whether alone or in public they exist in their own worlds, free to express themselves. But the need to be authentically oneself isn’t exclusively female. The rejection of gender roles through movement is not limited. For example, Nike’s ‘Never Ask’ campaign shows Russia’s first male synchronised swimmer, Aleksandr Maltsev, overcoming strict gender roles to achieve his dreams through dance. New Zealand beer manufacturers Speight have also used dance to confront toxic-masculinity within the category, blurring the boundaries of male friendship. This makes dance an extremely effective form of unspoken communication.

In our jaded and marketing-savvy world, movement offers a visceral connection that all consumers can feel a genuine longing for. Dance has the ability to traverse boundaries between the internal and external self, offering a physical escape from the societal confines of gender, hierarchy and responsibility, or even just from our own thoughts and anxieties. This sense of liberty is a truly powerful tool for both brands and consumers to harness.