Rise event: Superfans

At our Rise breakfast event today, Anna Chapman, director of Crowd DNA's Socialise division, talked about superfans - mapping their journey from hysterical outsiders to a brand’s best friend. Below are some key takeouts...

Fandom has existed in some form or other for centuries. The composer Liszt drove crowds wild with his brooding artist’s good looks and sweeping hair. So wild, in fact, that at the time the collective excitement around the famous composer was described as ‘Lisztmania’.

The very thought of fans prompts visions of screaming, hysteric devotees — teenyboppers reaching near dog whistle frequency on airport landing strips as John, Paul, George and Ringo step off their plane; or Elvis sending waves of swooning through his audience of adoring fans with every sway of his glittering hips.

Beatlemania
Beatlemania

Before the internet, the relationship between a fan and an idol was entirely one way. But that’s changed now that fans can interact directly with stars on social media.

In the age of the superfan, brands can directly engage with fan communities on social media, disrupting the traditional route. And in this ecosystem, superfans can join the likes of vloggers and even celebrities in becoming influential brand ambassadors themselves.

The ‘mania’ of fans of old has been channelled. Now, the superfan has agency, the power to share their passion amid their networks. And as more and more stars appear in celebrity-land’s night sky, the superfan’s power continues to reach new celestial heights.

We love talking about superfans, influencers, their passions and how these relate to brands. Please get in touch if you want to find out more.

Game Changers

Crowd DNA's Gabriel Noble explores how innovations in digital, social media and gaming are changing the sports we love and creating new opportunities for brands...

Sport is one of the last spaces to be truly disrupted by digital. As such, its stakeholders can take inspiration and lessons from past industries who have got it right, and wrong.

That was one of the key takeaways shared at the Digital Sport seminar at the Birkbeck Sport Business Centre. And based on the evidence shared by Chris Paget and Jonny Madill, two Sheridans sports lawyers who led the seminar, disruption is, as usual, being led by fans.

Sports fan behaviour is rapidly shifting. Fans of football, basketball and NFL no longer devote their undivided attention to live matches. In fact, 87% of fans second screen when watching live sport. The decreasing attention spans of audiences has led to cord-cutting: Premier League viewing figures have gone down 22% per game since the 2010-11 season, and viewing figures at the halfway stage for this season compared to the halfway stage last season have decreased by 11%. However, it’s not only decreasing attention spans that are causing this shift. Sports fans can now stream matches on various devices, and can catch the highlights as they happen via clips shared on social media.

Broadcasters are responding to this accordingly. Sky, for example, are investing more of their marketing budget on Sky Go, their streaming service, while BT Sport and Sky both upload goals from matches on Twitter immediately after they happen. Credit has to go to these broadcasters, who are adapting and engaging with their audience on their own terms, and in doing so creating new relationships with them.

However, this shift to social media doesn’t come without competition. Just this week, it was reported that Facebook were in talks with Major League Baseball about streaming one game per week from their upcoming season. This is a deal with a solid strategy from both sides in place. Facebook are reportedly keen to invest more in streaming live sports as they see it as an effective way of attracting sports fans to use the platform. Meanwhile, the MLB get the attention of a young audience, one that the league has been struggling to attract, as soccer and eSports continue to grow among this audience in the US.

Social media’s ability to attract a younger viewership was illustrated in the deal that the NFL did with Twitter. Though the stream of the first NFL game to be viewed totalled 2.1 million compared with the 14 million who viewed it on TV, 70% of people who watched it on Twitter were under the age of 35. This is extremely attractive to leagues like the NFL, who are keen to engage with, and win over, a young audience.

NFL's Twitter partnership
NFL's Twitter partnership

But where does all this leave the brands who sponsor sports teams, leagues and events? One place to look for inspiration is Budweiser and how they sponsored Euro 2016 highlight clips that ITV shared on Twitter. Throughout the tournament, 150 real-time tweets of Euro 2016 action were shared by ITV, with Budweiser advertising shown at the beginning and end of each clip. This exemplifies how sponsors should be adapting their strategy for the digital age.

Finally, how does this disruption effect the sports themselves? In January, the NBA commissioner Adam Silver said the NBA are looking to speed up the end of their games, in order to attract and retain fans who “have increasingly short attention spans.” He added, “it’s something that I know all of sports are looking at right now, and that is the format of the game and the length of time it takes to play the game.”

However, this is not a strategy that would be welcome in all sports. As Niall Coen on the Digital Sport podcast said, “mess with the formula of Premier League football, you do so at your peril. There’d be quite a backlash.”

A strategy that could be adapted by sports teams and leagues without affecting their integrity is acquiring eSports teams. eSports is a phenomenon that has taken the world by storm. In 2014, the League Of Legends World Finals attracted an audience of 45,000 in a stadium that once hosted the Fifa World Cup final in Seoul. The overall viewership of the Finals was 27 million. In 2016, the overall viewership of the Finals was 43 million.

League Of Legends World Championship Final
League Of Legends World Championship Final

Traditional sports teams have been getting in on the act by snapping up eSports teams. The Philidelphia 76ers, for example, have bought a League Of Legends eSports team. And football teams have been following suit, whether it’s Manchester City signing their own eSports player, or the French football league partnering with EA to create “e-Ligue 1”.

The investment in League Of Legends eSports teams is particularly interesting, as it suggests that traditional sports teams and franchises may become content platforms and brands outside of their own sport in order to adapt to the digital age.

One thing’s for sure, the digital model of eSports is working, and all stakeholders in the sports industry should take note.

The question that Chris and Jonny left on was, can sports keep pace with technological developments and consumer trends? We will have to wait and see, but it’s certainly a fascinating time to be involved.

Twitter Passions Meets LFW

We're excited to see Twitter release the first of our Passions film series to coincide with London Fashion Week...

Keep your eyes peeled for more Passions films – covering music, food, health, news, tech and more – over 2017.

See Crowd DNA\Socialise Director Anna Chapman discuss this and other types of superfandom over croissants on March 2. Book your place now.

360 & VR For Better Insights

We’re increasingly adding 360 and VR to our toolkit - here’s some best practice advice from Crowd DNA director Anna Chapman...

Many of our projects at Crowd DNA involve helping our clients to understand consumer needs and behaviour. And as consumer culture adopts new ways of doing things, we bring these trends into our work. That’s why last year we started to explore virtual reality and 360 cameras for insights work; after all, 89 million VR headsets were sold in 2016 (many of them in time for Christmas).

Consumers have an appetite for VR because it allows them to learn and experience the unusual in the comfort of their own home. From self-development to gaming to shopping, they’re keen to explore these opportunities. Who wouldn’t want to be on stage with their favourite band or fly around the moon without having to spend $150mil? Clients are keen to step into this virtual world too, exploring consumer lives through 360 footage and immersive experiences.

We’re using VR in two ways – as a tool for gathering insights (eg. using 360 cameras) and as a content format for immersing clients in the consumer world and socialising insight. Below are some thoughts around best practice for both.

- Google Cardboard is the go-to device for consumers – it’s inexpensive, easy to use and compatible with most smartphones.

- 360 footage is great for exploring spaces eg. if a client wants to look at the layout or products in a participant’s home.

- Keep VR experiences short (definitely under 15 minutes) – some people suffer side effects like tired eyes and dizziness. Not something you want a client to feel.

- Wearing a VR headset is more fun – and engaging – than looking at a powerpoint deck. Make this an activity at a client debrief or a workshop if you can.

- Think about how the content will be consumed – a 360 photo shot on a smartphone is much cheaper to produce and can be hosted on YouTube (see the Crowd office example above). At the moment this is more impactful and easier to send to a client than creating a bespoke headset experience.

- VR isn’t going to replace real life, it just adds another layer. Similarly, use VR to add an extra dimension alongside other methods and outputs.

Of course, the world of VR is changing rapidly and as it does, so will our methods for gathering and socialising insight. Microsoft’s HoloLens is calling out to developers to get involved in Mixed Reality or MR, which will merge the best bits of VR with Augmented Reality. Once this becomes more affordable, we’ll be able to offer headset-wearing clients even better experiences for exploring insights.

LOUD & CLEAR

Voice activation is set to become a dominant interface between ourselves and brands and experiences. Crowd DNA’s Andy Crysell gathers up notes from our recent work in the field, exploring the barriers to overcome and the opportunities ahead…

It isn’t so much a new thing, but voice activation – or voice computing – is certainly a fast gaining momentum thing. We know this because of the sales and media coverage of devices like Amazon Echo. But, as a business, we also know this as it’s a topic we’ve been asked to explore in several client briefs recently (that’s not something that would have happened much over a year ago).

Clearly there’s a huge opportunity here to create more frictionless and empathetic experiences – particularly in-home, at-work and in-(smart)car. Many of the experts we’ve been speaking to see it as a paradigm shift, something as revolutionary to our relationship with digital utility and entertainment as the rapid advancement of our mobiles was five to ten years ago.

As with most innovations of this kind, there’s a certain clunky-ness to it in its formative stages. Barriers stand in the way of true adoption. Recent data suggests 69% of Alexa’s 7,000 skills either have no reviews or just one review – this implies very low levels of adoption. Of those who enable a voice app on Google Assistant or Alexa, only three-per-cent are still active the week after. Moreover, we’re still to ascertain what kind of relationship we really want with a voice assistant – should it have a name; a gender; where does voice activation intersect with mood recognition and a deeper understanding of what’s on our mind?

Google Home
Google Home

Plenty of challenges, then. But the experts we’ve met believe that, once good use cases become popularised and eulogised, once the recognition process takes the necessary and inevitable steps forward, voice activation will gather pace quickly. They’ve spoken to us about how crazy it will soon look to be swiping away at a mobile. How we need to start comprehending the notion of invisible apps and invisible actions – the invisible interface, ultimately. That we should be ‘viewing’ voice computing as the next great platform.

What’s in it for media and for brands? A lot of our interviewees have spoken about untapping latent intent – all of the new things we will do, or things we currently do but will now do more abundantly – if we don’t have to reach for our phones, and if the cognitive load is reduced. The opportunity is there, they enthuse, for media and brands to be with us more often and more relevantly; to work towards seamless narratives that flow across devices and day parts.

So Nike tell us to ‘Just Do It’, and McDonald’s affirm ‘I’m Lovin’ It’, but how will they deliver against these messages on this emergent interface? Also fascinating is how a lot of the heavily used marketing maxims of recent times – the requisite for brands to have an authentic voice of their own; the need for brands to have a two-way conversation with consumers – will suddenly take on new and more direct meaning in the age of voice activation. Lots to think about – even more to talk about.

Part of InterFace, a series exploring – across digital and physical – how our touchpoints with brands are changing…

 

 

Power Of Audio

Introducing the Power Of Audio - a thought leadership study for Spotify...

We’re super excited to have worked with Spotify on their trailblazing thought leadership study, the Power Of Audio.

The project – which soft launched at CES – investigates and celebrates the role of sound in our lives, as well as looking at what the future of audio holds for brands and consumers.

We worked with 46 consumers in the US, UK, Brazil and Japan, conducting audio diary tasks (including deprivation phases), Skype interviews to dig deeper and filmed ethnographic sessions to truly build empathy around use cases and need states. We discovered a huge amount about people’s audio moments (singing in the shower among them!), how audio is used for mood control and the powerful recognition of brand sounds.

Our expert interviews ranged from artists and producers, to academics, marketing heads, innovators, advertising consultants and content producers. Each of them provided a fresh perspective on why audio matters so much. Themes explored included audio and memory, audio’s role in next generation marketing and the power of the podcast.

Check out our first film below – and you can find more content about the project at Spotify For Brands here. Watch this space for further video releases.

We’re really pleased to see our work for Viacom out in the public domain – with a first showing at the recent ESOMAR event in New Orleans...

We were given the very exciting mission of capturing new stories and insights from the sometimes-overlooked Generation X in eight cities – London, Rio, Budapest, Bangkok, Cape Town, Berlin, Mexico City and Bogota.

Building on a survey of over 12,000 adults carried out by research agency Tapestry Research, we used some great methodologies, including image gathering tasks on social, dinner party discussion sessions and ethnographic work, wrapping this up in our cultural analysis techniques and storytelling abilities.  All of which got us to powerful findings that challenge the tired, unimaginative messages generally used by media and advertising to connect with this cohort.

Our Socialise team got to experiment with some wonderful outputs, too. An installation that featured in Viacom’s New York and London offices, notepads and a 15-minute documentary.

For more information on the study check out internationalinsights.viacom.com

As the concept of luxury becomes increasingly intangible in the networked age, brands are experimenting with digital to attract Generation Z says creative delivery exec, Elizabeth Holdsworth...

In the post-recession age of discreet anti-bling (think Kinfolk: rustic, white-filtered and highly Instagram-able lifestyle scenes), the idea of luxury is becoming ever more abstracted, and brands are experimenting with ways to position themselves as aspirational within the digital realm. How do you engage with a generation that has grown up online, visually fluent teens who are skilful digital strategists on Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr? Add to the equation that, until recently, this generation neither expected – or have ever had to pay for – online content.

Burberry’s Snapchat campaigns were an early stride in conquering the ethereal world of teen luxury. Since then Snapchat has morphed into the new catwalk. Meanwhile on Instagram, Calvin Klein’s #MyCalvins campaign rolls around in bed with a flawless Kendall Jenner and takes to the skate park with an open-shirted Justin Bieber. Because Facebook’s biggest growing demographic is 55+, teens are seeking refuge away from older generations on platforms that are exclusive to them. Snapchat has over 100 million daily active users, 71% of which are under the age of 25.[1]

Originally released only on Tidal, Kanye West’s seventh studio album, ‘The Life Of Pablo’, is a haphazard attempt to bring luxury consumerism to the digital world of teens, the Gen Z demographic who are less interested in glitzy material possessions than the allure of new technology and services. Fans could only listen to’The Life Of Pablo’ by signing up to the premium streaming service.

Launched in October 2014, Perez Hilton labeled Tidal as ‘the streaming service for millionaires’, where the music itself takes on the flavour of a luxury status symbol. This sense of exclusivity comes from the subscription fee itself and also from the service’s options and respective price points — differences in audio quality that will only be perceptible to those already owning high-end sound systems. Any difference between Tidal’s so-called Premium and HiFi services will go unnoticed by consumers who are most likely to be streaming on smartphones and listening though headphones.

Tidal’s subscriber numbers reportedly doubled in the two weeks following the release of ‘The Life Of Pablo’, but it seems the tide of exclusive streaming is yet to turn. The platform is still dwarfed by services like Spotify, and has also failed to keep pace with Apple Music, which emerged around the same time. Retracting the original plan of Tidal-only exclusivity, ‘The Life Of Pablo’ has since emerged on other music services, achieving much greater impact. However Tidal’s subscriptions look set to explode following the release of Beyoncé’s video album Lemonade, available to view by subscription only.

This isn’t about luxury sound. Teens don’t care about lossless, hi-fi audio. They care about what’s trending, being part of the peer conversation, keeping up with the world’s biggest artists. This is about aspiration, of belonging, selling a more abstract idea of luxury than ever before — a dreamy Instagram still of the Kardashian Klan reclining in white Calvins. If luxury brands want to connect with Generation Z, they need to learn a life lesson from Pablo and continue to communicate these moments digitally, while constantly being aware of the limitations – though growing potential – of the paywall.

[1] DMR, By the Numbers: 60 Amazing Snapchat Statistics.